5 Seaton Gate Valley Stream, NY 11580(516) 825-5552
My Blog
By Errol Gindi, D.P.M.
August 31, 2017
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Bunions  

You can get your bunion pain and swelling under control. Find out how!bunions

While many people have bunions and don’t even notice them, there are others out there that experience a lot of pain and discomfort on a regular basis. If you are on the latter end of the spectrum, then you may be desperate to find treatment options to help quell your bunions. While these nonsurgical treatments that our Valley Stream, NY, podiatrist Dr. Errol Gindi is offering up won’t correct the deformity, it can provide you with the relief you’ve been looking for.

Here are some simple, everyday approaches you can take to tackling your bunion symptoms:

Wear the Right Shoes

Bunions can be exacerbated by the shoes you wear. If you love those skyscraper heels or you have shoes that bunch up your toes or push on your bunion, then you will have problems. Opt for shoes that don’t put pressure on the bunion and allow your toes free range to wiggle and move around. Also, avoid those high heels at all cost.

Lose the Weight

If you are overweight, you may find that your bunion symptoms are more severe. It’s important that you maintain a healthy weight if you want to keep your feet healthy. Feet already take on a lot of abuse and force every day. Think about how much more work they have to do if you are carrying around excess weight.

Consider Custom Shoe Inserts

Even the best of shoes don’t always provide the support that you need. If this is the case, our podiatrists in Valley Stream, NY, would be happy to create customized shoe inserts. These devices are placed into the shoes to provide support and stability for the foot to prevent foot deformities and other structural misalignments from causing pain and other problems.

If you are having trouble managing your bunion symptoms then it’s time you turned to the foot experts here in Valley Stream, NY. Don’t hesitate to reach out with questions or concerns. Bunions shouldn’t dictate your life and how you live it.

By Errol Gindi, D.P.M.
July 12, 2017
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Heel Pain  

The muscles, bones, and tissues of the feet are designed to keep us active every day, but sometimes injuries can slow us down. Heel painHeel Pain is one such injury affecting anyone from children to older adults. Dr. Errol Gindi, your foot doctor in Valley Stream, NY, sees many patients who visit his office with the chief complaint of heel pain. Below, he's answered some common questions he hears from those who have heel pain.

What causes heel pain?

Heel pain is often an injury of overuse; people who spend a lot of time standing or walking as part of their jobs - teaching, food service and medical careers - are all at risk for developing chronic heel pain. The conditions typically associated with heel pain include Achilles tendinitis (pain behind the heel) and plantar fasciitis (pain under the heel), which are both inflammations of the connective tissue inside the foot. Other causes of heel pain include arthritis, nerve entrapment, or stress fractures from sports like running, basketball or gymnastics. People who are obese may experience heel pain due to the extra weight that the feet are trying to support.

How do I know if I have chronic heel pain?

If you've been experiencing pain in your heel for longer than two or three weeks with little to no relief, your Valley Stream foot doctor will likely diagnose you with chronic heel pain. It's important, however, not to wait too long to see a podiatrist about your heel pain, an earlier treatment usually means quicker recovery.

How is heel pain treated?

Most heel pain-related conditions heal with conservative treatments like anti-inflammatory medication, stretching exercises, or modifications to your routine. Other people may find that shoe inserts or orthotics provide relief. Dr. Gindi, your Valley Stream foot doctor, will typically try these methods first before discussing more in-depth treatment options, such as shock wave therapy or surgery with his patients.

If you're dealing with heel pain, don't wait any longer! If you're in the Valley Stream, NY, contact podiatrist Errol Gindi to schedule an appointment today.

By Errol Gindi, D.P.M.
May 23, 2017
Category: Podiatrist
Tags: Toenail Fungus  

Find out the best ways to keep fungal infections from affecting your foot health.toenail fungus

Fungus is all around us, so it’s not too surprising that a lot of people deal with fungal infections at some point during their lifetime. Of course, if you are someone who is prone to getting toenail fungal infections, then you are probably trying to figure out why it keeps happening to you so you can stop it. Our Valley Stream, NY, podiatrist, Dr. Errol Gindi, is here to offer up some helpful ways to protect yourself from a fungal infection.

Wear the Right Shoes

Whether you are prone to sweaty feet or not, it’s always a good idea to wear shoes that allow your feet to breathe a bit, whether that includes wearing more open-toed shoes like sandals or flip-flops or looking for more breathable materials like canvas.

Switch Up Your Footwear

You should never be wearing the same shoes everyday, as this is just one way to increase your chances of developing a toenail fungus. To avoid this, give your shoes a full 24 hours to dry out completely before wearing them again. Make sure you have enough breathable shoes that you can continue to rotate them out throughout the week. If you deal with sweaty feet, consider placing an antifungal powder in your shoes before and after use.

Never Go Barefoot

No matter how great it might feel, if you are someone who is prone to toenail fungal infections you’ll want to wear shoes in public areas, whether you are showering at your local gym or you are changing in your school’s locker room. These areas of breeding grounds for fungus, so always bring flip-flops or sandals with you and wear them in these public areas where fungus likes to live.

Avoid the Salon

There are certainly some great nail salons out there but if you are hunting around for one, it’s always a good idea to check out the facilities and to ask questions about how they sterilize their instruments to protect against fungus. Since fungus can also be spread from wearing the same nail polish as an infected person, it’s always a good idea to either bring your own nail polish or buy a completely unopened bottle of polish.

Keep Feet Clean

Just like the rest of your body, feet also need to be properly cleaned each and every day. Remember to also trim your toenails regularly and to trim them straight across, rather than at an angle. If you have trouble trimming your toenails and keeping them healthy our Valley Stream foot doctor can help.

Are you dealing with toenail fungus and looking for treatment? Our Valley Stream, NY, podiatry office can help you. Call us today to learn more.

By Errol Gindi, D.P.M.
February 16, 2017
Category: Podiatrist
Tags: Athlete's Foot  

Athletes FootAthlete's foot is one of the most common fungal infections of the skin and is frequently seen in our office. Whether you've had it or not, it's important to understand how you can avoid and treat this highly contagious infection if you do contract it.

The fungus that causes athlete's foot thrives in damp, moist environments and often grows in warm, humid climates, such as locker rooms, showers and public pools; hence the name "athlete's foot. " This infection can itch and burn causing the skin on your feet and between your toes to crack and peel.

Tips For avoiding Athlete's Foot:

  • Keep your feet dry, allowing them to air out as much as possible
  • Wear socks that draw moisture away from your feet and change them frequently if you perspire heavily
  • Wear light, well-ventilated shoes
  • Alternate pairs of shoes, allowing time for your shoes to dry each day
  • Always wear waterproof shoes in public areas, such as pools, locker rooms, or communal showers
  • Never borrow shoes due to the risk of spreading a fungal infection

Treatment

A mild case of athlete's foot will generally clear up on its own with over-the-counter antifungal creams and sprays. But since re-infection is common due to its contagious nature, many people require prescribed anti-fungal medication to effectively treat the infection. Generally, it's always best to consult with your podiatrist before choosing a treatment.

Mild cases of athlete's foot can turn severe and even cause a serious bacterial infection. If you notice your rash has become increasingly red, swollen and painful or you develop blisters and sores, call our office right away. Athlete's foot left untreated could eventually spread to other body parts and infect other people around you.

With the right treatment, you'll be cured of your athlete's foot in no time, which means the sooner you can enjoy the activities you love without pain and irritation!

By Errol Gindi, D.P.M.
February 16, 2017
Category: Podiatrist
Tags: Welcome  

Welcome to the Blog of Errol Gindi, D.P.M.

Whether you are an existing patient or searching for a podiatrist in the Valley Stream, NY area, we’re excited you are here. With the podiatric industry advancing, we recognize the importance of keeping our patients and visitors up to date with all of the new and exciting things taking place in our practice.

As we move forward with our blog, we hope to promote good foot health as a vital part of your healthy lifestyle. Here you will find a variety of articles and topics including podiatry news, advancements in podiatric treatments, practical foot and ankle health advice and updates from our practice. 

We hope you find our blog to be helpful, engaging and informational to ensure your best foot and ankle health

As always, feel free to contact Errol Gindi, D.P.M. with any questions or concerns.

-- The Podiatry Team at Errol Gindi, D.P.M.





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